Teaching

I currently teach on the Honours Course Digital Society: Digital Technology, Inequality and Culture in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Glasgow. I have also designed and delivered lectures focusing on critical media studies, youth studies and the sociology of consumption, as well as on the use of the internet and new media in social research. I have teaching experience both at postgraduate and undergraduate levels.

 

Repurposing Social Media Platforms for Qualitative Research

Qualitative Methods (Postgraduate Level), Graduate School, College of Social Sciences, The University of Glasgow, October 2019

This lecture was designed for the Qualitative Method postgraduate programme and critically examined the use and repurposing of social media platforms, data and features for qualitative inquiry. Drawing on my research in which I repurposed Facebook Activity Logs and Search History as digital prompts in interview settings, the lecture addressed the ethical and practical issues raised by repurposing features not originally designed for research and encouraged students to reflect more broadly upon the methodological opportunities and challenges of using digital data and devices in social research.

A version of this lecture was given for the same programme in 2018.

Social Media and Consumption: Critical Perspectives on the Culture of Connectivity

MSc Sociology of Consumption, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow, November 2018

This lecture focused on social media and consumption and was designed for Honours students as part of the MSc programme Sociology of Consumption. It gave a brief overview of the emergence of Web 2.0 in relation to the ideology of the market and critically discussed how this has shaped normative discourses about connectivity and participation. The aim was to critically engage students with topical debates about digital labour, commodification of relationships, the convergence of private and public, the platformisation of the Web and surveillance.

A version of this lecture was given for the same programme in 2016.

 

Technological Innovations in Research: Using the Internet and New Social Media

Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences (Honours), School of Social and Political Sciences, The University of Glasgow, March 2017

This lecture was designed for the Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences programme and examined how the Internet and new social media have affected ways of doing social research. Drawing on scientific literature and empirical examples, it addressed ethical and practical issues around informed consent, anonymity, and privacy raised by research using digital data and engaged students with ongoing debates about the use of new technologies for social research.

 

Social Media and Young People: Problematic Representations of the ‘Digital Generation’ and Normative Discourses about Connectivity

MSc Crime, Media and Popular Culture, School of Social and Political Sciences, The University of Glasgow, October 2016

This lecture delivered as part of the MSc Crime, Media and Popular Culture at Glasgow University, examined the normative representations of the so-called ‘Digital Generation’ and the impacts that these have on young people’s lives. Using themes such as privacy, empowerment or connectivity, often connected to digital youth, this lecture critically discussed the representations of youth and their digital practices by different social groups (parents, teachers, young people themselves) and institutions (media, policy-makers).

 

Participatory Photography: Surveillance Under Scrutiny

Applied Qualitative Methods, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow, February 2016

What is participatory photography? How could photography be used in qualitative research and what are the limits and critiques addressed to this method? This lecture, drawing on an empirical study focused on participatory photography in social research and encouraged students to critically reflect on the practical and ethical challenges raised by participatory methods in research.

 

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